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Welkom bij het gezins-overzicht van WEGENER

Wegener, Jacob
geboren: ..-..-±1826 te Nieuwe Pekela
overleden: ..-..-1913 te Egmond aan Zee
begraafplaats: ...... te ........
beroepen: schipper, buitenvaarder, zeeman

getrouwd
22-12-1852
te Nieuwe Pekela

Piebes, Hinderika
geboren: ..-..-±1826 te Nieuwe Pekela
overleden: 05-01-1895 te Nieuwe Pekela
begraafplaats: ...... te ........
beroepen: ..........

Bron:
Burgelijke stand - huwelijk
Archieflocatie: Groningen
Soort Akte: Huwelijksakte
Nummer: 33

Bron: Burgerlijke stand - Overlijden
Archieflocatie: Groninger Archieven
Algemeen: Gemeente: Nieuwe Pekela
Soort akte: overlijden
Aktenummer: 2
Aangiftedatum: 08-01-1895

Click voor foto Click voor foto Click voor foto
Jacob Jans Wegener. The first picture was taken at a photo studio in Stadskanaal, probably at the same time as several other pictures we have. They were probably all taken around 1890. Unfortunately we can only identify two of the people (Jacob and his grandson Jacob Meindersma) so they are the only two included in these records. The second picture was probably taken in Italy as Italian words such as “Marzocchini” and “Livorno” appear on the back. This picture was possibly taken in the 1860’s while Jacob was in Italy with his ship. Many of the ships from Groningen seemed to spend a lot of time in Italy. The third picture is the ever-famous picture taken possibly around 1885, although it could also come from his days in the Seaman’s home 15 – 20 years later.
Click voor foto
Foto rond 1880 ?
Hinderika Piebes


kinderen:
Wegener, Jans
Wegener, Aaltje
Wegener, Geessien
Wegener, Hendrik
Wegener, Grietje
Wegener, Elsien
Wegener, NN



Jakob Wegener, when he was married, was a “buitenvaarder”, probably a sailor going to other lands.
He became a sea captain, ‘master of his own vessel’ to use the words of his daughter Alice.
He sailed to different ports in Europe and Alice, the oldest of his four daughters, often sailed with him.
One time when they were in a Russian seaport, they were invited to dine with royalty.
This was probably because Jakob had helped a Russian vessel in distress. A replica of Jakob’s ship is in the Ships Museum in Pegli, Italy, a suburb of Genoa.
His ship, the Schooner “Wieda Hendrieka” (or possibly the Alieda Henderika), is mentioned in a letter (apparently written after 1863, as that is the date given with most of the captains) along with four other ships and their captains.
His “nummervlag” (flag?) had a black number on a white background, circled in red.
This, and a mid to late 1800’s picture we have of a young man in Italy who looks like Jakob, indicates that at least one of his important ports of call was in Italy.
From a newspaper article sent by Rika Kooyman in Appeldorn in 1947: “Old Ships in Water Color”: This is an interesting discovery for Groningers, made in a maritime museum near Genoa.
Mr. G. J. J. de Yongh, Sr. from The Hague, wrote, “A few months ago I visited Pegli, a village close to Genoa in Italy. I went to the maritime museum, and in one of the upper exhibits I discovered 5 water color drawings in good condition and beautifully fraimed.
Since the names of the ships and the captains are probably not unknown in the province of Groningen, and it would probably be interesting for the descendants, I consider it important that you, by means of this much read newspaper, be informed where the drawings of these ships can be found on which grandfathers have been captains.”
One entry was: Schooner: Wieda Henderieka (Alieda Henderieka?), Nieuwe Pekela. Captain: J. J. Wegener. # of the flag: Red edge with black # on white field.
A schooner is a ship with two or more masts, all of which are fore-and-aft rigged, the main mast being “abaft of” and taller than the foremast.
According to his daughter Grietje (also known in English as Grace), Jacob didn’t talk about his travels by himself, but Grietje’s husband asked questions so he would tell the stories. Sometimes they couldn’t go out by ship because there was no wind, and sometimes because of war, for instance in 1876. The crew of 6 Dutchmen did much artwork and carving, for example making ships in bottles. It seems that the drawings of the ship that ended up in a museum in Genoa came from his crew members. Altogether Jacob spent 56 years at sea. Hinderika, according to her grand daughter Rika Kooijman, was more of a homebody. She didn’t like to travel much. Jacob spent his last days in the home for old seamen in Egmond aan Zee. One of Hendericka’s brothers who was also a seaman (probably Hindrik) lived in the home for old seamen in Egmond aan Zee at the same time Jakob lived there. We may have a picture of him.
In Dutch, Wegener means someone who weighs something. Weigh houses were common buildings in the Netherlands until the 1900’s. Most Wegeners are from Germany or Poland; the only other Dutch Wegeners I could find were from Nijmegen. I believe it’s usually “Waggoner” or “Wagenaar” in Dutch. And I’ve found a few records that spell Jacob’s name “Wagener”, although this may have been a misspelling. I did find another traveler with the name Jan Wegener: he was from Danzig, and married in Cochin, India.
Tidbits on Wegeners found over the internet:
- 1884: gift to Mr. J. Wegener, head of an elementary public school in Oude Pekela, to fulfil extra curricular duties, nl. organist by the Evangelisch Lutherse Gemeente (Lutheran church) and pastor of the Vereenide Doopsgezinde Gemeente (Mennonite church) in Oude Pekela. (probably a musical instrument)
- 1885: given things pertaining to teaching: teachers Wegener and Borgesius, by 215 students.
- 1887: request from J. Wegener on the ending of head of the community school and the starting of the position as head of the Oosterschool (East School).
- Graduate of the Zeevaartschool in Veendam: Wegener, Abraham Hzn 30-03-1851 Nieuwe Pekela. This was a cousin of Jakob Wegener (from Hindrik Jannes).
- There still seem to be a few Wegeners in the Netherlands, although not many. I didn’t find any living in the Pekelas in the 1900’s.

LETTERS FROM JAKOB WEGENER TO HIS FAMILY IN CHICAGO (translated by Peter Sluys)

Egmond aan Zee, April 1910
Dear Children and grandchildren,
The Lord was good to me when you sent me your letter and the pictures, since I received them in good health and got to know you are healthy as well.
I am specially happy with the pictures of Tjetske and her daughter Aaltje (Alice). They both look so beautiful on their photographs. I am pleasantly amazed when I see that little Aaltje is already laughing!
When I come home I will show both pictures to all in the family. At a later date I’d love to also have a picture of Tjetske’s husband (Richard). (Jakob was living in a home for old seamen in Noord Holland and he called Stadskanaal in Groningen home. It would probably be a day’s travel away by train. That is where his children lived.)
The month of March was beautiful here. Like summer! A lot of sunshine. I can’t remember ever having seen such a wonderful month of March since I was young.
I can’t tell you much about our children because they did not write me yet so I presume all is well and they are busy. So I can’t give you much news except that we had a good year, that Uncle H. Piebes who is healthy again greets you too. Otherwise all things have stayed the same. No special news. (H. Piebes, likely Hendrik Piebes, was most likely Jakob’s brother-in-law who was also a seaman and living at the same home as Jakob)
Greetings from all my friends. My own greetings again, and love to you all.
Your father and grandfather, J. J. Wegener


Egmond aan Zee, April 17, 1913
Dear Grandchildren Jacob and Mary,
Thanks to God’s blessing I am able to tell you that I received the letter you wrote on April 1 in good health and was happy that you could tell me that you are healthy and that the relatives in Chicago are doing well too. I received your letter on my birthday on the dot! That was April 15 when I turned 87. You, Jacob, must be turning 30 on April 5, don’t you? May you enjoy many blessings and much joy physically as well as spiritually. May you, dear Jacob and Mary, enjoy your life together yet for many years.
I received the $2 you sent me – thank you very much. My friends and I celebrated with coffee and cake.
They too are sending you their greetings. Yesterday we heard from Haak and Geesje that they and their children are doing fine. So do Elsje and her children; her letter reached me yesterday too. Our Mary who lives in Rotterdam wrote us that she and her family are in good health.
Jacob, her son, is making a mess out of his life and is not much of a son to her.
However, the other boys are fine guys.
Uncle Kooiman and Griet have not written so that we do not know much about them.
Just now while I am writing the mail came in and brought me a letter from Tonkin and Aaltje with a dollar bill in it. Although Aaltje seems to be “heavy set” (literally in Dutch: thick and fat!), she seems to be healthy.
I am glad for her.
Do you ever look nice on the picture together with all the others.
I sure did recognize you clearly!
Dear grandson and granddaughter I just have no other news.
Give your parents my greetings.
I hope to write them soon.
Greetings from your loving grandfather, J. Wegener


Egmond aan Zee, June 1913
Dear Grandson Jacob and Marie,
I can through this letter tell you that I’m still in good health, and I hope you are the same. That will be very healing for me.
I sent you my picture on June 21.
I would appreciate it if you would let me know immediately when you receive it.
I also sent one to Haak and Geisjie, and Kooyman and Grietje, also to Aunt Elssie, and also to Aunt Marie from Rotterdam. She wrote to me that all of her children are healthy.
Her son, Jacob, and her son, Jans, were both home, but Saturday they must sail again.
Jacob sails on an American steamboat, and he earns 65 guilders per month. He sails a head waiter.
She writes that he behaves well, and for that I’m very happy.
I can’t write about the rest of the family. I wrote to them when I went on vacation on June 2, but they haven’t answered yet. They are lazy writers. It’s not as though I can’t wait for them to write. If there isn’t anything important, they can wait to write.
I would send a picture to your parents also, but I don’t know their address.
Greet your parents, brothers and sisters.
Now, beloved grandchildren Jacob and Marie, there isn’t anything else I have to say.
My friend also greet you.
Greetings from your loving grandfather.
J. J. Wegener


EGMOND AAN ZEE, near Amsterdam:

The sea resort was an independent municipality until 1977 when it merged with Egmond Binnen. In 1840, it had 1500 inhabitants.
In the 19th century it still had importance as a fishing village but soon developed into a seaside resort when physicians began to recognize the health advantages of salt water bathing.
Its present beach is wide and puts Egmond in the top-four of North Sea resorts. The lighthouse is a local landmark and was built in 1838. Shortly after, the structure became the local monument to 1831 naval hero Van Speyk who blew up his ship and crew rather than surrender during the Belgian independence conflict.
Another landmark in Egmond aan Zee, the Maritime Museum, is housed in the former old age home for sailors, while the municipal museum highlights both local history and the region's tie to the volunteer coast guard.



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